Diabetes Pilot PC Software Review - Page 4

Accessibility

Diabetes Pilot uses all the expected accessibility shortcuts and tab navigation but the use of color only to convey important information could be a problem for some users.  The rest of the program is far more accessible than most software. I was able to perform all major functions without a mouse. There are a few  very minor focus issues when using Alt + shortcuts, but nothing that blocked functionality. Overall I found Diabetes Pilot far more accessible than most software of this type.

Intuitiveness

Diabetes Pilot is intuitive to use.  The developers have done a good job laying out the components of the software. It is easy to find what you need.  The user interface is a little institutional in design but it works.

Data Backup / Restoring

Under the File section you can choose to backup datasets per user for safe keeping or if you are migrating to a new computer. After several backups and imports of my data I had no issues.  Diabetes Pilot periodically makes backups of your data and you can choose to restore your database from one of these backups.
The developers of the software have done a good job in providing built-in tools to repair the database and restore to earlier conditions.  In conducting my review I pounded on this software and did things that break most databases.  Not once did I have to restore the database from a backup. 

Although accurate and convenient for detecting type 2 diabetes and prediabetes in adults, current HbA1c cutoffs may not be enough to diagnose diabetes in children.

A 2010 clinical practice guideline from the American Diabetes Association recommends that physicians exclusively use the HbA1c assay to detect diabetes. The guidelines recommend a cutoff of 6.5% or greater for diagnosis.

However, researchers for two recent studies highlight significant vulnerabilities in the recommended test’s ability to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes in children.
www.healio.com

The meta-analysis included data from eight observational cohort studies and 11 randomized controlled trials that involved diabetes and measuring vitamin D. The investigators, who were from Tufts Medical Center and Carney Hospital in Massachusetts, found that overall, individuals who consumed more than 500 International Units (IUs) per day of vitamin D had a 13 percent reduced risk of type 2 diabetes when compared with those who consumed less than 200 IU per day.
www.emaxhealth.com