Diabetes Pilot PC Software Review - Page 4

Accessibility

Diabetes Pilot uses all the expected accessibility shortcuts and tab navigation but the use of color only to convey important information could be a problem for some users.  The rest of the program is far more accessible than most software. I was able to perform all major functions without a mouse. There are a few  very minor focus issues when using Alt + shortcuts, but nothing that blocked functionality. Overall I found Diabetes Pilot far more accessible than most software of this type.

Intuitiveness

Diabetes Pilot is intuitive to use.  The developers have done a good job laying out the components of the software. It is easy to find what you need.  The user interface is a little institutional in design but it works.

Data Backup / Restoring

Under the File section you can choose to backup datasets per user for safe keeping or if you are migrating to a new computer. After several backups and imports of my data I had no issues.  Diabetes Pilot periodically makes backups of your data and you can choose to restore your database from one of these backups.
The developers of the software have done a good job in providing built-in tools to repair the database and restore to earlier conditions.  In conducting my review I pounded on this software and did things that break most databases.  Not once did I have to restore the database from a backup. 

Scientists at the Diabetes Research Institute have developed a revolutionary technique to provide critical oxygen for maintaining the survival of insulin-producing cells.
www.diabetesresearch.org

Boston, MA—In a new study, researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) have found that eating processed meat, such as bacon, sausage or processed deli meats, was associated with a 42% higher risk of heart disease and a 19% higher risk of type 2 diabetes. In contrast, the researchers did not find any higher risk of heart disease or diabetes among individuals eating unprocessed red meat, such as from beef, pork, or lamb. This work is the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the worldwide evidence for how eating unprocessed red meat and processed meat relates to risk of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.
www.hsph.harvard.edu