Diabetes Pilot PC Software Review - Page 4

Accessibility

Diabetes Pilot uses all the expected accessibility shortcuts and tab navigation but the use of color only to convey important information could be a problem for some users.  The rest of the program is far more accessible than most software. I was able to perform all major functions without a mouse. There are a few  very minor focus issues when using Alt + shortcuts, but nothing that blocked functionality. Overall I found Diabetes Pilot far more accessible than most software of this type.

Intuitiveness

Diabetes Pilot is intuitive to use.  The developers have done a good job laying out the components of the software. It is easy to find what you need.  The user interface is a little institutional in design but it works.

Data Backup / Restoring

Under the File section you can choose to backup datasets per user for safe keeping or if you are migrating to a new computer. After several backups and imports of my data I had no issues.  Diabetes Pilot periodically makes backups of your data and you can choose to restore your database from one of these backups.
The developers of the software have done a good job in providing built-in tools to repair the database and restore to earlier conditions.  In conducting my review I pounded on this software and did things that break most databases.  Not once did I have to restore the database from a backup. 

A DIABETIC woman from Northampton has been presented with a medal to mark 70 years of coping with the condition.

When Grace Jarnell was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes while aged 12 in 1942, treatment was so basic she had to heat her own samples at home over a Bunsen burner to see if she needed insulin.

Now, more than 100,000 injections later, she has defied the worst fears of doctors and been awarded a medal in recognition of seven decades of coping with the condition.

www.northamptonchron.co.uk

A key mechanism that appears to contribute to blood vessel damage in people with diabetes has been identified by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
www.news.wustl.edu