Diabetes Pilot PC Software Review - Page 3

Reports

Average BG by Category - Shows your average glucose organized by category. This is the most beneficial graphs. Users can quickly see where they need to improve their management habits.

Average BG by Hour - Shows your average glucose as an average for each hour of the day. This chart is just as beneficial as the “By Category” Chart. Whereas the category chart help identify your glucose levels by Carb intake, this chart helps see what effects time of day may have on your glucose level. Of course the food you eat is most likely the most obvious reason why your blood sugar rises, it is not always the ONLY reason. Your liver makes glucose from fat and some of us have a very productive liver. I can rise at 5:00 am with a BG reading of 85, and at 8:00 am have a BG of 150 without eating/drinking a single thing.  This “dawn effect” can be tricky to manage, but being able to track hourly BG levels does help.

Average BG by Month - Shows your average glucose by month. Tracking BG by month is perhaps the best means to see just how well you’re doing. If you occasionally miss logging your BG levels, the monthly average is less affected than a shorter time frame.

Glucose Graph - Graphs your individual glucose readings over time. This is the most common graph found in BG graphing. A simple plot line from reading to reading. I like these graphs because sometimes I forget about those random high or low readings. When I look at a whole months worth of data and see more than a handful of over 200 readings it highlights for me that there might be a problem.

Glucose 24 Hr Overlap - Graphs several days of glucose readings overlapped on a single 24 hour graph to help identify daily patterns in your data. One of my pet peeves in graphs are average readings without providing the information used to calculate the averages.

The 24 hour overlap is a great graph for viewing the data used to create the Average BG by Hour graph. All those colored lines can be confusing to interpret but if you look at the 12:00 PM time slow you see two readings that very close to 200. The same data when viewed in the BG by Hour charts shows an average of 157. To some people a 157 average may seem good. I look at the overlap graph and see two days where something was not right.

Glucose 24 Hour Overlap Average by Hour

Glucose Monthly Overlap - Graphs several months of readings overlapped on a single 1-month graph to help find monthly patterns in your data.

Record Listing - Lists your records in a manner similar to how they appear on the My Records page.

Record Listing (Plain) - Lists your records in a manner similar to how they appear on the My Records page.

Record Grid - Shows your records in a grid format organized into columns for each record type.

Logbook/By Category - Shows your records in a "logbook" grid format organized by category

Daily Food Summary - Summarizes food intake by day.

Meal Listing - Lists the foods and nutritional content in your meal entries

Meal Listing (Plain) - Lists the foods and nutritional content in your meal entries in a format suitable for export to spreadsheets and other programs.

Medication Totals - Shows a total of the medications you've entered for each day.

Exercise Totals - Shows a total of the exercises you've entered for each day

Glucose by Range - Shows the number of glucose measurements in your target range, above your "high" limit, and below your "low" limit.

Blood Pressure List - Lists your blood pressure readings

Recent BG Averages - Shows your average glucose for various time periods.

Weight Graph - List your weight records

 

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