Glossary of Diabetic Terms - U

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U-100: See unit of insulin.

Ulcer: A break in the skin; a deep sore. People with diabetes may develop ulcers from minor scrapes on the feet or legs, from cuts that heal slowly, or from the rubbing of shoes that don't fit well. Ulcers can become infected and should be treated promptly.

Ultralente insulin: A type of insulin that is long acting, usually the action of this type of insulin works for 25-36 hours after injection. This type of insulin has an onset of action four to five hours after injecting and works most powerfully at eight to 14 hours after injection.

Unit of insulin: The basic measure of insulin. U-100 is the most common concentration of insulin. U-100 means that there are 100 units of insulin per milliliter (ml) of liquid. For the occasional patient that has severe insulin resistance insulin is available as a U-500 form.

Unstable diabetes: See brittle diabetes.

Urine testing: Checking urine to see if it contains ketones. If you have type 1 diabetes, are pregnant and have diabetes, or have gestational diabetes, your doctor may ask you to check your urine for ketones. This is an easy test done at home with a dipstick measure.

Urologist: A doctor who specializes in treatment of the urinary tract for men and women, as well as treatment of the genital organs for males.

Recent headlines about cinnamon are the result of an accidental finding in a Maryland USDA research center. Incredibly, the catalyst was as American as good old apple pie, flavored with -- what else -- cinnamon. Scientists were testing the effects of various foods on blood sugar (glucose) levels. They expected the classic pie to have an adverse effect, but instead they found it actually helped lower blood glucose levels.

The researchers then took their surprising discovery and tested it in a small 60 patient study conducted in Pakistan, reporting in the journal Diabetes Care. All the patients had been treated for type 2, adult onset diabetes for several years and were taking anti-diabetic drugs to increase their insulin output. But they were not yet taking insulin to help process their blood glucose. The subjects were given small doses of cinnamon ranging from as little as a quarter teaspoon to less than 2 teaspoons a day for 40 days.
www.thyroid-info.com

Yesterday, I heard a patient advocate say he was thankful for diabetes. He said, “If I had to choose a disease, type 1 diabetes isn’t a bad choice. Sometimes I feel thankful for having it.” The 40-something who said this was speaking on the radio as I was driving. I nearly swerved off the road.
www.diabetes24-7.com