Glossary of Diabetic Terms - S

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Saccharin: An artificial sweetener that is used in place of sugar because it has no calories and does not increase blood sugar.

Self-blood glucose monitoring: See home blood glucose monitoring.

Somogyi effect: Also called "rebound effect," it occurs when there is a upward swing in blood sugar from an extremely low level of glucose in the blood to a very high level. It usually happens during the night and early morning hours. People who experience high levels of blood sugar in the morning may need to test their blood sugar levels in the middle of the night. If blood sugar levels are repeatedly low, addition of an evening snack or a lowering of the insulin doses may be recommended.

Sorbitol: A sugar -- produced from fruits -- that the body uses slowly. It is a sweetener used in diet foods and is called a "nutritive sweetener" because it has four calories in every gram, just like table sugar and starch. These compounds are used in many foods labeled as 'sugar free' and 'no sugar added' and can raise your blood glucose. Because a food is labeled 'sugar free,' it doesn't necessarily mean carbohydrate free.

Sucrose: Table sugar; a form of sugar that the body must break down into a more simple form before the blood can absorb it and take it to the cells.

Sugar: A class of carbohydrates that tastes sweet. Sugar is a quick and easy fuel for the body to use. Some types of sugar are lactose, glucose, fructose, and sucrose.

Sulfonylureas: Pills or capsules that people take to lower the level of sugar in the blood. These oral diabetic medications work to lower your blood sugar by making your pancreas produce more insulin.

According to a new study published in the British Medical Journal, regularly eating white rice significantly increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes.

The authors from the Harvard School of Public Health looked for evidence of the association between eating white rice and Type 2 diabetes in previous studies and research. The new study focuses on finding a direct link between the risk and the amount of rice eaten. This study also seeks to determine if the risk of Type 2 diabetes is greater in Asian countries, whose diet consists of more white rice than westerners.
www.redorbit.com

Although accurate and convenient for detecting type 2 diabetes and prediabetes in adults, current HbA1c cutoffs may not be enough to diagnose diabetes in children.

A 2010 clinical practice guideline from the American Diabetes Association recommends that physicians exclusively use the HbA1c assay to detect diabetes. The guidelines recommend a cutoff of 6.5% or greater for diagnosis.

However, researchers for two recent studies highlight significant vulnerabilities in the recommended test’s ability to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes in children.
www.healio.com